Timeline

Spring 2007 – GSU is founded by a group of 15 students concerned about disparities in fellowship packages.

Fall 2007 – Healthcare and teaching pay emerge as major issues in GSU conversations with fellow students

Winter 2008 – In January, GSU launches a petition for pay raises a reduction in fees, and healthcare for graduate student workers, which gathers 500 signatures. In February, a group of 175 students visits the Provost’s office to present the petition.

August 2008 – The University announces a dramatic pay increase for graduate student workers: TA wages are doubled, from $1,500 to $3,000 per quarter; instructor wages go from $3,000 to $5,000

January 2009 – GSU and allies hold student meetings on the Student Care Center.

February 2009 – The Vice President of Campus Life announces plans for Student Care Center improvements, including many of the recommendations made by GSU.

2009-2010 – Multiple GSU efforts draw attention to grad student fees.

May 2009 – A Provost-convened committee recommends reducing the burden of annual Advanced Residence fees ($2352).

February 2010 – Provost decides not to reduce annual AR or other fees, which together with insurance premiums cost over $5000, highlighting once again the need for formal union recognition and collective bargaining.– Provost decides not to reduce annual AR or other fees, which together with insurance premiums cost over $5000, highlighting once again the need for formal union recognition and collective bargaining.

May 2010 – GSU votes to affiliate with the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and the American Association of University Professors (AAUP).

2010-11 – GSU builds up membership; launches campaign for affordable childcare for graduate student parents.

November 2011 – GSU gathers 2800 signatures on a petition urging the National Labor Relations Board to rule on a case regarding graduate employees’ right to unionize (before the Board’s quorum expires). Shortly thereafter, President Obama appoints three new members to the NLRB, ensuring quorum for 2012.

April 2012 – GSU organizes a letter-writing campaign, urging the NLRB to rule on the case.

April-May 2012 – GSU, in collaboration with the Student-Parent Organization, gathers 1100 signatures on a petition to the University administration, demanding affordable childcare for student parents. GSU and SPO also organize a panel, “Toward a Parent-Oriented University,” where student, faculty, and staff parents discuss urgently needed changes with Provost Deborah Nelson. Provost announces improvements to the parental leave policy for graduate student parents, reflecting GSU’s demands.

June 2012 – NLRB announces it will rule on the case (after a 2-year silence). The AFL-CIO, AFT, AAUP, and National Education Association (NEA) jointly submit an amicus brief on behalf of private university graduate employees, with input from GSU.

Advertisements